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Monday, August 17, 2020 | History

2 edition of Fall rates of prescribed fire-killed ponderosa pine found in the catalog.

Fall rates of prescribed fire-killed ponderosa pine

Michael G. Harrington

Fall rates of prescribed fire-killed ponderosa pine

by Michael G. Harrington

  • 320 Want to read
  • 26 Currently reading

Published by U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, Intermountain Research Station in Ogden, Utah .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Prescribed burning -- Colorado.,
  • Ponderosa pine.

  • Edition Notes

    StatementMichael G. Harrington.
    SeriesResearch paper INT -- RP-489., Research paper INT -- 489.
    The Physical Object
    Pagination7 p. :
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL16023382M

    top, the pine snags tended to fall by uprooting. Ponderosa pine killed by prescribed fire was also studied by Harrington (), on the San Juan National Forest. Fall rates were higher than in the California and Oregon studies. Five years after death, up to 50% of trees were down (in the spring/summer burn treatment). Nine years after death.   Fire is a naturally occurring phenomena in Ponderosa Pine dominated plant communities. Exploring the Nature of Wyoming is produced by: University of Wyoming Extension Sustainable Management of.

    Discover Book Depository's huge selection of Michael G Harrington books online. Free delivery worldwide on over 20 million titles. Although black-backed woodpeckers occupy habitats created by wildfire, prescribed fire, and mountain pine beetle infestations, the relative value of these habitats remains unknown. We studied habitat-specific adult and juvenile survival probabilities and reproductive rates between April and August in the Black Hills, South Dakota.

    Ponderosa pine is typically dominant on warm, dry sites with a short growing season and very low summer precipitation. Temperatures annual average 41° to 50° F with extremes ranging from ° to ° F. Being drought tolerant, it out competes other species to . Prescribed fire is an important tool in the management of ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Dougl. Ex Laws.) forests, yet effects on bark beetle (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, Scolytinae) activity and tree mortality are poorly understood in the southwestern U.S. We compared bark beetle attacks and tree mortality between paired prescribed-burned and unburned stands at each of four.


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Fall rates of prescribed fire-killed ponderosa pine by Michael G. Harrington Download PDF EPUB FB2

Books to Borrow. Top American Libraries Canadian Libraries Universal Library Community Texts Project Gutenberg Biodiversity Heritage Library Children's Library. Open Library. Books by Language Journal of materials engineering.

Journal of paediatric dentistry. Additional Collections. Fall rates of prescribed fire-killed ponderosa pine. Ogden, Utah: U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, Intermountain Research Station, (OCoLC) Material Type: Government publication, National government publication: Document Type: Book: All Authors / Contributors: Michael G Harrington; Intermountain Research Station (Ogden.

Fall rates of prescribed fire-killed ponderosa pine. Ogden, Utah: U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, Intermountain Research Station, (OCoLC) @article{osti_, title = {Fall rates of prescribed fire-killed ponderosa pine. Forest Service research paper}, author = {Harrington, M G}, abstractNote = {Fall rates of prescribed fire-killed ponderosa pine were evaluated relative to tree and fire damage characteristics.

High crown scorch and short survival time after fire injury were factors leading to a high probability of early tree fall. Fall rates of prescribed fire-killed ponderosa pine were evaluated relative to tree and fire damage characteristics.

High crown scorch and short survival time after fire injury were factors leading to a high probability of early tree fall. The role of chemical defense mechanisms is discussed.

Fall rates of prescribed fire-killed ponderosa pine. By Michael G. Harrington and Utah) Fall rates of prescribed fire-killed ponderosa pine book Research Station Colorado, Ponderosa pine, Prescribed burning. Publisher: Ogden. Harrington MG () Fall rates of prescribed fire-killed ponderosa pine.

USDA Forest Service Research Paper INT-RP Hebblewhite M, Munro RH, Merrill EH () Trophic consequences of postfire logging in a wolf-ungulate system.

Fall Rate of Lodgepole Pine Killed by the Mountain Pine Beetle in Central Oregon Article (PDF Available) in Western Journal of Applied Forestry 13(1) January with Reads.

Within ponderosa pine ecosystems, fire returned approximately every years. This estimate of fire frequency is based on several studies that date fire scars on individual trees (point sample) or from several fire-scarred trees in an area (composite fire interval) (Table 1).

scribed burn on ponderosa pine mortality (Harrington). Our study was designed originally to examine the effects of season of prescribed burn on mortality of ponderosa pine from black stain root disease (BSRD) caused by Lepto-graphium wageneri var.

ponderosum (T. Harrington & F. Cobb) T. Harrington & F. Cobb and its poten. Prescribed burning in southwestern ponderosa pine can greatly, but only temporarily, reduce fuel hazard (HarringtonSackett ); to tons per acre. Ten years after a fire in Oregon, Dahms () found that slightly more than half of the dead P.

ponderosa had fallen, rising to 78% by 12 years post-fire. Harrington () reported that 75% of prescribed fire-killed ponderosa pine and Gambel oak fell within 10 years of the fire. In addition, fall rates may differ with season of burn where rates following prescribed fire in the spring may be higher than rates in the dormant season, possibly due to lower allocation of resin during the growing season to fight insect attack (Harrington,McHugh et al., ).

texts All Books All Texts latest This Just In Smithsonian Libraries FEDLINK Fall rates of prescribed fire-killed ponderosa pine [microform] by Harrington, Michael G; U.S.

Forest Service Intermountain Region. Created on. July 31 Jeff Kaplan Archivist. Harrington MG () Fall rates of prescribed fire-killed ponderosa pine. USDA Forest Service, Intermountain Forest and Range Experiment Station, Research Paper INT-RP (Ogden, UT). The West s vast ponderosa pine forest has been home to people for thousands of years.

Ponderosa from distant mountains provided timbers for the ancient pueblos of the Southwest. Nomadic Native Americans often wintered among the large pines and peeled bark for food in s: 5. The Biodiversity Heritage Library works collaboratively to make biodiversity literature openly available to the world as part of a global biodiversity community.

Fall rates of prescribed fire-killed ponderosa pine. View Metadata. By: Harrington, Michael G. - Intermountain Research Station (Ogden, Utah) Arizona Internet resource. Grand Canyon National Park Wildland Fire Management Plan a managed ponderosa pine forest in western Montana – implications for resource Fall rates of prescribed fire- killed ponderosa pine.

Intermountain Research Paper INT- RP- Ogden, Utah. Hendricks, D.M. Arizona Soils. Abstract We evaluated the effects of thinning and fertilization on eight indices of susceptibility to insects in loblolly pine trees (Pinus taeda L.) growing in a year-old plantation in eastern Virginia, U.S.A.

Resin flow rates, starch concentratons in phloem, an index of relative growth, and bark and phloem thickness all were greater in trees in thinned plots than in control or fertilized. In book: Ecological Restoration of Southwestern Ponderosa Pine Forests, Edition: 1st, Chapter: 13, Publisher: Island Press, Editors: Peter Friederici, pp Cite this publication Joy Nystrom Mast.

Coarse woody debris has numerous functions in forest ecosystems, including wildlife habitat, fuel loading, and nutrient cycling. Standing dead trees, or snags, are particularly important resources for wildlife, and guidelines for snag recruitment and retention are integral parts of forest management.

However, snag persistence is not well understood and existing models are poorly validated.southwestern ponderosa pine on organic matter and nutrients in woody debris and forest floor. Fall rates of prescribed fire- killed ponderosa pine. Intermountain Research Paper INT- RP- Ogden, Utah.

National Park Service. Smoke management plan for Tusayan and Grand Canyon Village. A cooperative plan developed by Kaibab NF. Tree mortality from mountain pine beetle infestation also ranges from near zero to total stand replacement, depending on the distribution of host species and ages [Shore et al., ].

Snag fall rate (attrition rate) also varies greatly across landscapes and is strongly affected by salvage activities since harvest removes the larger snags.